LINEAR A-LEVEL COURSE CONTENT

English Literature involves wide reading: literary works from a variety of genres and time periods, so that you’ll begin to appreciate key texts and genres.
The course also combines close analysis with wider concepts, including the development of genres, and you’ll begin to explore various critical approaches.

WHAT MIGHT STUDYING THIS COURSE LEAD TO?

As a highly respected academic subject, it is valued in Higher Education as a basis, not only for studying Literature at university, but also Law or Joint Honours degrees. It is prized by employers, and can lead to a future in Law, Teaching, Publishing, or business related careers.

WHAT SKILLS WILL I DEVELOP?

At A-Level you’ll develop your skills in writing formal analytical essays, including learning how to construct a personal line of interpretation and writing with sophistication. In addition you’ll
develop your discursive and presentation skills, as you’ll take a leading role in lessons. Moreover, independent study and wide independent reading are key features.

WHAT DO I NEED TO DO THIS COURSE?

GCSE 5A*- C plus grade 6 in GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature. To succeed you also need to enjoy reading, enjoy thinking about language and be able to think analytically.

WHAT IS UNIQUE ABOUT THIS SUBJECT?

You only study literary texts and how to adopt critical approaches. It allows the opportunity to read widely and write creatively and study particular periods in more depth.

You also have the opportunity to work independently on Non-Exam Assessment.

HOW MANY EXAMS DO I HAVE TO TAKE AND WHEN DO I TAKE THEM?

Linear A-Level: Two exams at the end of Year 13.

Paper one is 2 hours and 30 minutes long and contributes towards 40% of the A-Level. Paper two is 3 hours long and contributes towards 40% of the A-Level. The remaining 20% is based on a Non-
Exam Assessment (NEA)

IS THERE ANY COURSEWORK OR CONTROLLED ASSESSMENTS?

At A-Level, Non-Exam Assessment (NEA) comprises two essays of 1250-1500 words each, or one essay and a re-creative place with a commentary.
The Critical Approaches taught include Marxism, Feminism, Eco-critical theory, Narrative theory, Post-colonialism and The Canon with a different approach applied to each task.